Collared Dove – 2007-12 winter

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident

This map was produced by the West Wales Biodiversity Information Centre using data collected between November and February for the BTO Atlas 2007-11, with additional data collected in 2011-12 winter to fill gaps in coverage.

The Winter Atlas of 1981 – 84 concluded that winter distribution was essentially similar to that of the breeding season. Having colonised the county the Collared Dove had become largely sedentary. The winter distribution for 2007-12 is also similar to that of the breeding atlas 2003-07.

The Migration Atlas (2002) indicated that ringing results showed a greater movement during the colonisation years of 1965 – 79 than in later years, a further indication that a large degree of population stability had been achieved.

Flocks of up to 130 Collared Doves were not uncommon in wintertime Pembrokeshire up to the 1970’s, with a gathering of 200 at Porthlysgi the largest recorded. Such flocking died out with grain harvests and storage becoming less wasteful during the 1980’s. There was a later resurgence in winter flocking, with 38 at Saundersfoot in 1990, 30 at both Trefasser and Lleithyr in 1995, 60 at Roch Gate in 1997, 87 at Llanrhian in 2001, 40 at Letterston and 50 at Johnston in 2003, 57 at Mathry in 2004 and 28 at Treleidr in 2008, though what attracted these groupings seems not to have been put on record.

Graham Rees (County bird recorder 1981 to 2007)

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO Atlas 2007-11 – plus an extra winter of fieldwork

More about the Collared Dove in Pembrokeshire

Collared Dove – 2003-07 breeding

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident

Comparison with previous atlas:

1984-882003-07
Breeding confirmed7369
Breeding probable113199
Breeding possible7941
No of tetrads occupied265 (of 478)309 (of 490)
Percentage of tetrads55.4%63.1%

Most people, whether they live in town or village, will be familiar with this pale buff dove with its striking dark collar and monotonous cooing song. Originally a bird of the Orient, it has expanded its range to eventually colonise Britain. It first nested in Pembrokeshire in 1961 and was widespread by the time of the 1984-88 survey. It has been found to have a close association with human habitation, occurring around farmsteads, small holdings and gardens but to be absent from more open countryside. Its flimsy nest is placed in trees, particularly conifers and it is able to breed all year long.

Comparison of the two survey results shows a 15% increase in distribution by the latter period. This compares with an 18% increase in Wales as a whole between 1984 and 2007 noted by the BBS. The estimated Pembrokeshire breeding population of 1,600 – 2,100 which accompanied the survey of 1984-88, was based on a range of six to eight pairs per occupied tetrad, which attempted to cater for higher densities in suburban areas than in isolated homesteads. The same situation prevailed during the 2003-07 survey, so applying the 15% increase to the earlier estimate suggests a breeding population in the range of 1,830 to 2,440 pairs in the county.

Graham Rees (County bird recorder 1981 to 2007)

Rees G.H., Haycock R.J., Haycock A, Hodges J.E., Sutcliffe S.J., Jenks P, and Dobbins R. 2008, Atlas of Breeding Birds in Pembrokeshire 2003-07. Pembrokeshire Bird Group.

More about the Collared Dove in Pembrokeshire

Collared Dove – 1994

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident

Map produced by the West Wales Biodiversity Information Centre
1984-88
Breeding confirmed73
Breeding probable113
Breeding possible79
No of tetrads occupied265 (of 478)
Percentage of tetrads55.4%

The Collared Dove arrived in Pembrokeshire in 1961 when one was recorded at St Bride’s on 18 April (J.W. Donovan), some six years after the first record for Britain. That same summer a colony of four pairs had established itself at St Davids. They had rapidly spread across the county within four years, with further colonisation up to at least 1976. Although widely distributed (see map) there is a degree of patchiness, with substantial colonies in some places whilst being sparse or absent in intervening areas. At an average density of six to eight pairs per tetrad the total population for Pembrokeshire is probably 1,600-2,100 pairs. Flocks of 70-130 became a feature of winter­-time Pembrokeshire from 1967 to the late 1970s, with a gathering of 200 recorded at Porthliski in 1973. Such large flocks ceased to form during the 1980s, though whether this represents a population decrease or a change in habits is not known.

Collared Doves were seen flying out to sea towards Ireland during the major expansion period of the 1970s, mostly in flocks of less than ten, although 26 flew over the South Bishop on 7 May 1976. They still visit the offshore islands as far out as the Smalls, particularly in spring, so although present throughout the year there is a dynamic element at work within the population. Closer study might well show our Collared Dove population to be far from stable.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

More about the Collared Dove in Pembrokeshire

Collared Dove – 1980s winter

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident

The BTO winter atlas showed that Collared Doves were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84.

The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 50 birds in a day, reflecting winter flocking.

Graham Rees (County bird recorder 1981 to 2007)

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Lack, P. 1986 Atlas of wintering birds in Britain and Ireland. T & A.D. Poyser.

More about the Collared Dove in Pembrokeshire

Collared Dove – 1968-72 breeding

Streptopelia decaocto – Breeding resident.

Red = breeding confirmed,

Orange = breeding probable,

Yellow = breeding possible

The Collared Dove originated in the Oriental region and may have been introduced into Asia Minor and the Balkans. It began to extend its range about 1930, rapidly progressing across Europe, reaching Hungary in 1932, Germany by 1943, France by 1950, Belgium by 1952 and began breeding in Norfolk in 1955.

The Collared Dove was first recorded in Pembrokeshire when Jack Donovan saw one at St Bride’s on the 18th April 1961. By May of that year four pairs were nesting at St David’s. It had become widely, though sparsely, distributed across the county by 1969.

Graham Rees (County bird recorder 1981 to 2007)

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Sharrock, J.T.R., (1977). The Atlas of Breeding Birds in Britain and Ireland. T. & A.D. Poyser.

More about the Collared Dove in Pembrokeshire

Collared Dove

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident

Collared Dove – 2007-12 winter

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident The Winter Atlas of 1981 – 84 concluded that winter distribution was essentially similar to that of the breeding season. Having colonised the county the Collared Dove had become largely sedentary. The winter distribution for 2007-12 is also similar to that of the breeding atlas 2003-07. The […]

Collared Dove – 1994

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident 1984-88 Breeding confirmed 73 Breeding probable 113 Breeding possible 79 No of tetrads occupied 265 (of 478) Percentage of tetrads 55.4% The Collared Dove arrived in Pembrokeshire in 1961 when one was recorded at St Bride’s on 18 April (J.W. Donovan), some six years after the first […]

Collared Dove – 1980s winter

Streptopelia decaocto – TURTUR DORCHOG – Breeding resident The BTO winter atlas showed that Collared Doves were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84. The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 50 birds in a day, reflecting winter flocking. […]

Collared Dove – 1968-72 breeding

Streptopelia decaocto – Breeding resident. Red = breeding confirmed, Orange = breeding probable, Yellow = breeding possible The Collared Dove originated in the Oriental region and may have been introduced into Asia Minor and the Balkans. It began to extend its range about 1930, rapidly progressing across Europe, reaching Hungary in 1932, Germany by 1943, […]