Common Sandpiper – 1994

Actitis hypoleucos – PIBYDD Y DORLAN – Passage migrant and winter visitor, formerly bred

Mathew (1894) stated that Common Sandpipers bred near Maenclochog. Lockley et al. (1949) chose not to admit this record and there have been no breeding records in Pembrokeshire since.

Autumn passage commences as early as 19 June and continues to mid-October, with a late group of 11 on the Cleddau Estuary on 11 November 1984. Small parties of up to 13 occur on all estuaries, on coastal pools, rocky shores, offshore islands and inland ponds and streams.

Up to four winter on the Cleddau Estuary each year, most consistently at Westfield Pill. One wintered on the Nevem Estuary in 1968 and one was seen at St Bride’s Haven on 26 January 1987.

Spring passage is smaller than that of the autumn, with groups of up to five stopping off briefly between 5 April and 24 May and seen in similar areas.

They have been heard passing over the county at night and have been seen during lighthouse attractions at the Smalls and South Bishop.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

More about the Common Sandpiper in Pembrokeshire

Common Sandpiper – 1980s winter

Actitis hypoleucos – PIBYDD Y DORLAN – Passage migrant and winter visitor, formerly bred

The BTO winter atlas showed that Common Sandpipers were present in six estuarine 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84.

The darkest colour represents 2 birds seen a day, the lighter blue represents one bird in a day. The UK is at the northern extremity of the winter range of this species.

Graham Rees. Pembrokeshire County Bird Recorder 1981-2007

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Lack, P. 1986 Atlas of wintering birds in Britain and Ireland. T & A.D. Poyser.

More about the Common Sandpiper in Pembrokeshire

Common Sandpiper – 1894

Tringoides hypoleucus – A summer visitor.

This pretty species, which sometimes goes by the name of the “Summer Snipe,” arrives about the middle of April from the south, by which date we always noticed a pair or two by the western Cleddy beneath Stone Hall. They remained for a week or ten days, and then quitted us for their nesting places higher up the stream. When fishing the brooks that run down from the Precelly Mountains near Maenchlogog, in June and July, we always found these Sandpipers abundant, and very noisy and excited when we were near their nests or young.

In company with Ring Ouzels, Dippers, Common Snipe, Wheatears, Grey Wagtails, and Whinchats, we were glad to welcome them, and regarded their lively presence as they flew before us up the stream with their peculiar jerking flight with pleasure, as they added the charm of beauty and interest to our ramble.

Early in August the Sandpipers leave their nesting stations and descend with their young to the mouths of the streams, by whose banks they have spent the summer, and pass a couple of months on the salt marshes and in the muddy creeks adjoining the shore before they migrate southwards for their winter quarters.

Mathew M.A. 1894, Birds of Pembrokeshire and its Islands

More about the Common Sandpiper in Pembrokeshire

Common Sandpiper

Actitis hypoleucos – PIBYDD Y DORLAN – Passage migrant and winter visitor, formerly bred

Common Sandpiper – 1994

Actitis hypoleucos – PIBYDD Y DORLAN – Passage migrant and winter visitor, formerly bred Mathew (1894) stated that Common Sandpipers bred near Maenclochog. Lockley et al. (1949) chose not to admit this record and there have been no breeding records in Pembrokeshire since. Autumn passage commences as early as 19 June and continues to mid-October, with a late […]

Common Sandpiper – 1980s winter

Actitis hypoleucos – PIBYDD Y DORLAN – Passage migrant and winter visitor, formerly bred The BTO winter atlas showed that Common Sandpipers were present in six estuarine 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84. The darkest colour represents 2 birds seen a day, the lighter blue represents one bird in a day. The UK […]

Common Sandpiper – 1894

Tringoides hypoleucus – A summer visitor. This pretty species, which sometimes goes by the name of the “Summer Snipe,” arrives about the middle of April from the south, by which date we always noticed a pair or two by the western Cleddy beneath Stone Hall. They remained for a week or ten days, and then quitted us for their […]