Goosander – 1994

Mergus merganser – HWYADEN DDANHEDDOG – Scarce winter visitor. Not recorded in April, May, July and August

Both Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al. (1949) regarded the Goosander as a regular winter visitor, the latter adding the qualification “scarce”.

The Welsh breeding population has been increasing in recent years, from the first record in 1970 to an estimated 150-200 pairs by 1985 (Tyler 1989), and although they have not bred in Pembrokeshire they have begun to occur more frequently. Records show occurrences in only six years between 1950 and 1970, but then in 18 years post-1970 and in every year since 1983, usually between November and February. Goosanders have been seen on the coast at Fishguard Harbour and on the Nevern and Cleddau Estuaries, particularly during cold weather, but most occur on fresh water, principally Rosebush and Llysyfran reservoirs and Bosherston Pools. Single birds are most frequently seen, but up to 14 together have been reported, with red-headed birds predominating.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

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Goosander – 1980s winter

Mergus merganser – HWYADEN DDANHEDDOG – Scarce winter visitor. Not recorded in April, May, July and August

The BTO winter atlas showed the 10km squares where Goosanders were recorded during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84.

The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents 4-10 birds seen in a day.

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Lack, P. 1986 Atlas of wintering birds in Britain and Ireland. T & A.D. Poyser.

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Goosander – 1894

Mergus merganser

A regular winter visitor; not uncommon.

One shot by Mr. W. Summers on the lake at Heathfield in the early spring of 1884, was sent to us, and although infested by a large parasite was in good condition; it was a female. Heathfield is several miles from the coast. Another was obtained at Tregwynt, on the north coast, in January, 1888. We ourselves watched one swimming and diving in the lake at Stackpole, March 22, 1888.

Mr. H. W. Evans, of Solva, possesses a pair of Goosanders in his collection, male and female, that were shot in Solva harbour. Mr. Dix says the Goosander occurs more frequently than the Red-breasted Merganser. The Mallard Goosander, in full plumage, is the most beautiful of all the divers that visit our estuaries and bays in the winter time.

Mathew M.A. 1894, Birds of Pembrokeshire and its Islands

More about the Goosander in Pembrokeshire

Goosander

Mergus merganser – HWYADEN DDANHEDDOG – Scarce winter visitor. Not recorded in April, May, July and August

Goosander – 1994

Mergus merganser – HWYADEN DDANHEDDOG – Scarce winter visitor. Not recorded in April, May, July and August Both Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al. (1949) regarded the Goosander as a regular winter visitor, the latter adding the qualification “scarce”. The Welsh breeding population has been increasing in recent years, from the first record in 1970 to an […]

Goosander – 1980s winter

Mergus merganser – HWYADEN DDANHEDDOG – Scarce winter visitor. Not recorded in April, May, July and August The BTO winter atlas showed the 10km squares where Goosanders were recorded during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84. The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents 4-10 birds […]

Goosander 1949

Species account from the Birds of Pembrokeshire, 1949, by Lockley, Ingram and Salmon.

Goosander – 1894

Mergus merganser A regular winter visitor; not uncommon. One shot by Mr. W. Summers on the lake at Heathfield in the early spring of 1884, was sent to us, and although infested by a large parasite was in good condition; it was a female. Heathfield is several miles from the coast. Another was obtained at Tregwynt, on the north coast, […]