Jackdaw – Nordic type – records

Coloeus monedula mondula – JAC Y DO

2010 – An individual showing features of the Nordic race monedula was at Haverfordwest all year.

2011 – A bird showing characteristics of the race C.m.monedula, “ Nordic Jackdaw “ was present for a second year in Haverfordwest

2012 – (DJA) and at St. Davids in April (BD). Both records have been accepted by WRP. Another individual was present all year in Fishguard but no photographs of this bird have been submitted to WRP yet.

2013 – Birds showing features of the Nordic Race C.m. monedula reported Haverfordwest all year (DJA), at Nine Wells 25th Nov till the end of the year (MYP) and at Monkton 7th Jan & 7th Dec (CH).

2014 – Birds showing characteristics of “Nordic Jackdaw” were reported at: Nine Wells 1st Jan, at Sealyham in mid-Feb (MYP), Skomer 3rd Apr & 15th Nov (JM, EMS)

2015 – An individual showing characteristics of the race ‘monedula’ at Sealyham from January to March (MYP).

2016 – Individual showing characteristics of the Nordic form C. m. monedula photographed at Haverfordwest 3rd Dec (CH).

2017 – Two individuals showing characteristics of the Scandinavian race C.m. monedula were observed at Stackpole on 13th Nov (BH).

More about the Jackdaw in Pembrokeshire

Jackdaw – 2003-07 breeding

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident

Comparison with previous atlas:

1984-882003-07
Breeding confirmed356361
Breeding probable2318
Breeding possible7058
No of tetrads occupied449 (of 478)437 (of 490)
Percentage of tetrads93.9%89.2%

At the close of the survey of 1984-88 it was realized that the only assessment of breeding Jackdaw numbers anywhere in the county came from the islands of Skokholm and Skomer. An estimate of the population for the whole county had not previously been attempted. An assessment that an average of 20–30 pairs per tetrad was possible was used, postulating that there were 9,000–13,000 pairs breeding in Pembrokeshire. The 1988-91 National Atlas calculated an average density across the UK which was a little lower than the lowest value used for the initial local survey. The National Atlas also assessed relative abundance, the map of which showed Pembrokeshire at maximum. Making an adjustment to allow for this density suggests that the original estimate of 20 pairs per tetrad in the county was realistic. The BBS then indicated a 36%increase in Wales as whole between 1994 and 2007. No evidence was found that such an increase had taken place in Pembrokeshire but some sign that it has not.

Over the years there has been a 33% decline in the number breeding at Skokholm and a 66% decrease at Skomer. Studies on the islands have shown very low productivity even during times when breeding numbers increased there, meaning birds were being recruited from the mainland. The declining numbers which followed suggests such recruitment ceased, probably because there was no longer a surplus of birds on the mainland. With this in mind it seems best to be cautious and consider that county numbers had not increased. In this case the breeding population in Pembrokeshire at the end of 2007 was thought to have been about 9,000 pairs.

Graham Rees. Pembrokeshire County Bird Recorder 1981-2007

More about the Jackdaw in Pembrokeshire

Jackdaw – 1994

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident

1984-88
Breeding confirmed356
Breeding probable23
Breeding possible70
No of tetrads occupied449 (of 478)
Percentage of tetrads93.9%

A common resident according to Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al (1949), the Jackdaw is probably the most versatile of Pembrokeshire’s birds, for it has learnt to exploit just about every niche in the county, nesting in quarries, on crags, in trees, in buildings and other man-made structures, in the sea cliffs of the mainland and on the larger offshore islands.

They were noted breeding in burrows at Skomer as early as 1860 (Lockley et al.). Wintle (1924) recorded them nesting in fair numbers on Caldey in 1924 and Lloyd found that they were an established breeding bird on Ramsey in 1927.  Skokholm was colonised in 1965, with numbers building to a peak of 60 pairs between 1975 and 1978 but declining to only five pairs by 1992.  At Skomer they increased from 20 pairs between 1946 and 1958 to 200-250 pairs in 1961, and the 1991 census fround 248 pairs.  Colony size elsewhere varies widely, but an estimated average density of 20-30 pairs per tetrad would mean a total breeding population of 9,000-13,000 pairs.

They form large communal roosts outside the breeding season, that at St David’s Cathedral being notable for creating so much noise during their evening assembly that it eclipses the best efforts of the choir!

Despite numerous records of Jackdaws flying about over the sea we have found no evidence to confirm immigration of emigration.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

McCANCH, N. 1985. A lighthouse notebook. London, Michael Joseph.

WINTLE, W.J. 1924. Some Caldey birds Pax 71:133-139

More about the Jackdaw in Pembrokeshire

Jackdaw – 1980s winter

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident

The BTO winter atlas showed that Jackdaws were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84.

The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 400 birds.

The map plot reflects winter flocking in the coastal plain and consequent large roosts.

Graham Rees. Pembrokeshire County Bird Recorder 1981-2007

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Lack, P. 1986 Atlas of wintering birds in Britain and Ireland. T & A.D. Poyser.

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Jackdaw – 1949

Corvus mondedula spermolegus

Common resident, except at Skokholm and Grassholm, where only a spring migrant at same time as Rook.  Breeds on cliffs and in ruins, etc, inland.  A writer in the Field, 2 June, 1860, noted that it bred in burrows at Skomer; it still does this – in sea-bird burrows on the edge of the cliffs.

R.M.Lockley, G.C.S.Ingram, H.M.Salmon, 1949, The Birds of Pembrokeshire, The West Wales Field Society

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Jackdaw – 1894

Corvus monedula – A common resident.

Very abundant on the cliffs, about all old buildings, such as the ruins of the Bishop’s Palace at St. David’s, Pembroke Castle, &c, about isolated dwellings in the wilder part of the county, where the birds fill up all the chimneys with their nests, and in doing this were a great plague to us at Stone Hall, and nesting also in hollow trees.

To be seen with Rooks robbing the grain in the autumn from the stooks in the corn-fields. It is the custom in Pembrokeshire for the stooks to be left out a month or six weeks before ” leading in,” and the birds have thus an opportunity to take their full tithe. Nor do they neglect to attack the ricks in the farm-yard, and we were often compelled to drive them away by shooting at them. In spite of all their mischief the Jackdaws are great favourites of ours, and we always enjoyed seeing them and watching their lively gestures on the coast, where their noisy chatter would be greatly missed.

At St. David’s gardening operations, especially in the Deanery garden, are carried on under great difficulties, owing to the impudent thefts of the Jackdaws that swarm there at all times of the year; and little can be had in the way of fruit or vegetables without careful protection by nets, &c. Fishing tackle and hooks, and a great variety of curious things, have been found in the Jackdaws’ nests in the ruins of the Bishop’s Palace at St. David’s.

Mathew M.A. 1894, Birds of Pembrokeshire and its Islands

More about the Jackdaw in Pembrokeshire

Jackdaw

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident

Jackdaw – 2003-07 breeding

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident Comparison with previous atlas: 1984-88 2003-07 Breeding confirmed 356 361 Breeding probable 23 18 Breeding possible 70 58 No of tetrads occupied 449 (of 478) 437 (of 490) Percentage of tetrads 93.9% 89.2% At the close of the survey of 1984-88 it was realized that the […]

Jackdaw – 1994

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident 1984-88 Breeding confirmed 356 Breeding probable 23 Breeding possible 70 No of tetrads occupied 449 (of 478) Percentage of tetrads 93.9% A common resident according to Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al (1949), the Jackdaw is probably the most versatile of Pembrokeshire’s birds, for it has learnt to […]

Jackdaw – 1980s winter

Corvus monedula – JAC Y DO – Breeding resident The BTO winter atlas showed that Jackdaws were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84. The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 400 birds. The map plot reflects winter flocking […]

Jackdaw – 1949

Species account from the Birds of Pembrokeshire, 1949, by Lockley, Ingram and Salmon.

Jackdaw – 1894

Corvus monedula – A common resident. Very abundant on the cliffs, about all old buildings, such as the ruins of the Bishop’s Palace at St. David’s, Pembroke Castle, &c, about isolated dwellings in the wilder part of the county, where the birds fill up all the chimneys with their nests, and in doing this were a great plague to […]