Linnet – 2003-07 breeding

Linaria cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant

Comparison with previous atlas:

1984-882003-07
Breeding confirmed137127
Breeding probable109205
Breeding possible9849
No of tetrads occupied344 (of 478)381 (of 490)
Percentage of tetrads72%77.8%

The Linnet is a common finch of Pembrokeshire, though in decline elsewhere. The male with a red wash to the breast and forehead, twittering flight calls, and white edgings to wings and tail, is still a familiar sight, particularly around the coast and hills. The Linnet breeds in areas of rough grassland, sometimes in loose colonies. Much of this type of grassland has now been lost to more intensive agriculture, although some areas remain here, perhaps more so than elsewhere in the UK.

During the 1984-88 survey a figure of 25 pairs per tetrad was used to estimate the total population, which produced the figure of 8,600 pairs for Pembrokeshire. During the 2003-07 survey, the number of tetrads in which Linnet was recorded has increased by c.10%; the total tetrads with probable breeding increasing by c. 100%. Whether the breeding density has changed is perhaps for further testing. The BBS has recorded a decline of 27% in the Linnet population for the UK between 1994 and 2006. The long term trend 1974–2006 showed a decline in the order of 57%. Pembrokeshire may therefore be an important stronghold for this species.

Richard Dobbins

More about the Linnet in Pembrokeshire

Linnet – 1994

Carduelis cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant

1984-88
Breeding confirmed137
Breeding probable109
Breeding possible98
No of tetrads occupied344 (of 478)
Percentage of tetrads72%

The Linnet was a common resident during the times of both Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al. (1949). It is still a widespread breeding species but is probably less numerous, as many rough areas of the county have been reclaimed for agricultural purposes in recent years. The unsprayed roadside margins are important feeding grounds. With an estimated average density of 25 pairs per tetrad, about 8,600 pairs probably breed at present.

A small spring passage has been recorded between 19 March and 29 May, when groups of up to 30 pass; some are apparently still on the move until 15 June. Larger numbers have been recorded moving through coastal regions in the autumn, from early September to late October, with up to 100 passing in a day.

They are less widespread in winter and some may emigrate, but flocks of 100-500 do gather at good food sources. Turnips that have gone to seed prove particularly attractive, as does unharvested flax.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

More about the Linnet in Pembrokeshire

Linnet – 1980s winter

Carduelis cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant

The BTO winter atlas showed that Linnets were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84.

The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 99 birds.

Linnets can be difficult to find in wintertime because the majority can flock in small areas.

Data collected by volunteers for the BTO. Lack, P. 1986 Atlas of wintering birds in Britain and Ireland. T & A.D. Poyser.

More about the Linnet in Pembrokeshire

Linnet – 1894

Linota cannabina – A common resident.

This, one of our favourites among the smaller birds, because of its general cheerfulness and bright little song, is very numerous with us, as might well be expected in a county so abounding in furze. We used to detect a number of nests in all our brakes, and in the autumn and winter never failed to observe large flocks in the stubbles and turnip fields of “Brown” Linnets, as they are then aptly called, because of their uniform grey brown winter plumage.

Mathew M.A. 1894, Birds of Pembrokeshire and its Islands

More about the Linnet in Pembrokeshire

Linnet

Carduelis cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant

Linnet – 2003-07 breeding

Linaria cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant Comparison with previous atlas: 1984-88 2003-07 Breeding confirmed 137 127 Breeding probable 109 205 Breeding possible 98 49 No of tetrads occupied 344 (of 478) 381 (of 490) Percentage of tetrads 72% 77.8% The Linnet is a common finch of Pembrokeshire, though in decline elsewhere. […]

Linnet – 1994

Carduelis cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant 1984-88 Breeding confirmed 137 Breeding probable 109 Breeding possible 98 No of tetrads occupied 344 (of 478) Percentage of tetrads 72% The Linnet was a common resident during the times of both Mathew (1894) and Lockley et al. (1949). It is still a widespread breeding species but […]

Linnet – 1980s winter

Carduelis cannabina – LLINOS – Breeding resident and passage migrant The BTO winter atlas showed that Linnets were present in most 10km squares during the winters of 1981-82, 1982-82 and 1983-84. The darker the colour, the higher the relative total count for each 10km square.  The darkest blue represents over 99 birds. Linnets can be difficult to […]

Linnet – 1968-72 breeding

Red = breeding confirmed Orange = breeding probable Yellow = breeding possible More about the Linnet in Pembrokeshire

Linnet – 1949

Species account from the Birds of Pembrokeshire, 1949, by Lockley, Ingram and Salmon.

Linnet – 1894

Linota cannabina – A common resident. This, one of our favourites among the smaller birds, because of its general cheerfulness and bright little song, is very numerous with us, as might well be expected in a county so abounding in furze. We used to detect a number of nests in all our brakes, and in the autumn and winter […]