Pied Flycatcher – first and last dates

Ficedula hypoleuca – GWYBEDOG BRITH – Breeding summer visitor and passage migrant. Not recorded from November to March

Earlier records are summarised in Pied Flycatcher 1994

YearFirst arrival Last date recorded
199310 April12 October
199419 April9 October
19959 April8 October
199616 April17 October
199720 April30 September
199823 April29 September
199924 April28 September
20007 April1 October
200113 April13 October
20025 April7 October
200315 April27 September
20041 May24 September
200519 April1 October
200618 April24 September
200726 April8 October
200819 April11 October
200913 April12 September
201024 April12 October
201120 April8 October
201221 April27 September
20137 May16 September
201416 April28 September
20159 April10 October
201611 April8 October
201710 April26 October
20183 April27 September
201918 April19 September
202017 April18 October

Records extracted from the Pembrokeshire Bird Reports which may contain more detail than shown here

More about the Pied Flycatcher in Pembrokeshire

Pied Flycatcher – 2003-07 breeding

Ficedula hypoleuca – GWYBEDOG BRITH – Breeding summer visitor and passage migrant. Not recorded from November to March

Pied Flycatchers were first proved to breed in Pembrokeshire, at Ffynone, in 1978 but they may have bred at Llancych in 1936. Colonisation of Pembrokeshire took place in the late 1970’s and 1980’s and the 1984-88 survey estimated the county population was about 100 pairs by 1988. Since then the population has undergone a decrease, so by the time of the 2003-07 survey there had been a 39% contraction in its county distribution. Even during the course of the survey there was known contraction, those breeding at Blackpool Mill Leat in 2003 having disappeared by 2004. It is estimated that 30 pairs were nesting in Pembrokeshire by the end of 2007. Pied Flycatchers decreased in the UK by 49% between 1996 and 2006 according to the BTO, early indications being because they have not adapted to peak food availability being advanced as a result of the trend towards earlier springs. Consequently the Pied Flycatcher has been amber-listed under the Birds of Conservation Concern 3 (Eaton et al., 2009). 

Graham Rees. Pembrokeshire County Bird Recorder 1981-2007

Comparison with previous atlas:

1984-882003-07
Breeding confirmed164
Breeding probable1115
Breeding possible4
No of tetrads occupied31 (of 478)19 (of 490)
Percentage of tetrads6.5%3.9%

Records extracted from the Pembrokeshire Bird Reports which may contain more detail than shown here

EATON. M. A, BROWN. A. F, NOBLE. D. G, MUSGROVE. A.J, HEARN. R. D, AEBISCHER. N.J, GIBBONS. D. W, EVANS. A, GREGORY. R. D. 2009. Birds of Conservation Concern 3, British Birds, 102, 296-341.

More about the Pied Flycatcher in Pembrokeshire

Pied Flycatcher – 1994

Ficedula hypoleuca – GWYBEDOG BRITH – Breeding summer visitor and passage migrant. Not recorded from November to March

1984-88
Breeding confirmed16
Breeding probable11
Breeding possible4
No of tetrads occupied31 (of 478)
Percentage of tetrads6.5%

Mathew (1894) considered the Pied Flycatcher to be a rare visitor and did not personally encounter one, though he knew of occurrences at Stackpole and Pembroke. Lockley et al. (1949) stated that it was a passage migrant in small numbers.

Lloyd suspected a pair was breeding at Lancych in 1936 and Lockley et al. noted that a singing male was at Nevern in 1941 and 1942 but that no nest was found. They were found breeding at Ffynone from 1978 onwards and a pair bred in a nest box at the Rhos in 1983. The Pied Flycatcher has subsequently further colonised Pembrokeshire and by the end of the Breeding Birds Survey of 1984-1988 at least 100 pairs were breeding (see map).

This colonisation has taken place while long-established populations elsewhere, e.g. in mid-Wales, have been at a high level, and also at a time when trees that replaced those cut down during World War II reached suitable maturity. Several nest box schemes such as that at Pengelli Forest Nature Reserve have also benefited Pied Flycatchers. Similar schemes operating in the 1960s did not attract the species, so presumably there was not then any surplus in other populations which could provide colonists.

Up to four at a time pass through coastal districts in the spring between 14 April and 27 May, being most noticeable on the islands of Skomer and Skokholm.

They are recorded passing through the islands and most coastal areas in the autumn between August and 27 October, with up to ten occurring at individual sites.

Donovan J.W. & Rees G.H, 1994, Birds of Pembrokeshire

More about the Pied Flycatcher in Pembrokeshire

Pied Flycatcher – 1894

Muscicapa atricapilla – A rare summer visitor, only occasionally noticed.

We have never met with it in the county. Of late years the Pied Flycatcher has been ascertained to be far from an uncommon bird in many districts in northern and central Wales, generally frequenting woods at some elevation above the sea-level on mountain sides, where it nests in holes in oak trees. But we have no record of its nest ever having been obtained in Pembrokeshire, where it appears to be only a rare passing visitor.

There are specimens in Lord Cawdor’s collection at Stackpole Court that were obtained in the neighbourhood, and Mr. Dix was informed by Mr. Tracy that the bird was occasionally seen in spring and autumn. It is not included in the lists of county birds supplied us by Mr. H. Mathias and Sir Hugh Owen.

Mathew M.A. 1894, Birds of Pembrokeshire and its Islands

More about the Pied Flycatcher in Pembrokeshire

Pied Flycatcher

Ficedula hypoleuca – GWYBEDOG BRITH – Breeding summer visitor and passage migrant. Not recorded from November to March

Pied Flycatcher – 1994

Ficedula hypoleuca – GWYBEDOG BRITH – Breeding summer visitor and passage migrant. Not recorded from November to March 1984-88 Breeding confirmed 16 Breeding probable 11 Breeding possible 4 No of tetrads occupied 31 (of 478) Percentage of tetrads 6.5% Mathew (1894) considered the Pied Flycatcher to be a rare visitor and did not personally encounter […]